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November 29, 2009
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Half-lock Folds, Part 4 by ZejanNoSaru Half-lock Folds, Part 4 by ZejanNoSaru
ARTIST'S NOTE: I now have links in each commentary so you can jump to the next page in the sequence. To continue to the next installment, click here: [link]

HALF-LOCK FOLDS - AN APPLICATION

Here’s a little extra tutorial on half-lock folds that involves drawing baggy jeans. Someone asked for this advice on-line elsewhere many, many months ago and then ignored me after I posted it. Maybe it’ll be of more use here.

Drawing baggy jeans is not as difficult as it seems, once you know your folds, in particular the half-lock folds. Baggy jeans are basically jeans that are a size or two (maybe more) larger than what would make a good fit for the body. This means there’ll be a lot of excess fabric to go around, especially around the legs, and a lot of those half-locks will occur.

First let's look at an example of a seated figure. In the top drawing, the shape and pose of the figure is roughly blocked in. I used a mannequin figure - good as any for the purpose. The diagram directly below Example 1 shows the points where compression will occur, indicated by the double arrows. The direction of compression is shown by the red lines. The greatest amount of compression will occur at the points where the lines come together. In the second drawing, the compression points are translated to the figure itself. Finally, in drawing number three, the jeans are drawn with the folds following the points of compression. Notice how the jeans make the legs of the figure look much bulkier than they actually are.

Now take a look at the second picture. In the first part of the drawing, labeled A, the leg of the jeans is hanging straight, following the pull of gravity. In the second part, B, it can be seen how the excess fabric crumples, or compresses, around the leg, ankle and foot while the foot is flat on the floor. Take notice of the points where the fabric will compress, according to the bends in the form beneath.

I hope this has been useful advice. Thanks for stopping by!
:iconfuyu-oleander:
fuyu-oleander Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This is great!
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:icongndprivate:
GNDPrivate Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2010
It is very useful :)
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