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Folds - Half-Lock by ZejanNoSaru Folds - Half-Lock by ZejanNoSaru
ARTIST'S NOTE: I now have links in each commentary so you can jump to the next page in the sequence. To continue to the next installment, click here: [link]

Here's the first page of my tutorials on half-lock folds. It looks kinda skimpy, for which I apologize. I can't figure out what the heck is going on with my scanner...

ZEJAN'S ART TIPS – HALF-LOCK FOLDS

The following is one of a series of informational guidelines desgined to aid an artist in a specific area of illustration. These guides will contain both text and images. It is hoped that this information will allow the reader to expand their ability to render a subject more to their satisfaction. With that in mind, Let's begin!

TO REVIEW:

The first lessons covered some of the more basic folds – Pipe and Drape folds, which both occur when fabric hangs from one or two points of support. The next folds are caused when fabric folds back in on itself. These folds have many names, depending on who is describing them, but I’ll use the term Half-Lock to describe them.

HALF-LOCK FOLDS

Half-lock folds occur when tubular or flat pieces of fabric change direction. As stated previously, the fabric thus affected has nowhere to go, and the fold that results is due to this re-arranging of excess material. This particular fold can exhibit all kinds of characteristics, but the key thing to remember is that it results from the excess material being forced to collapse onto itself. Because of this, the important thing to remember about half-lock folds is that they are less an effect of gravity and more an effect of compression, though they can appear in some draped fabrics.

You will encounter half-lock folds mostly at the inside of the elbow and the back of the knees, when the fabric covering them is bent by the action of the arm or leg. The fold always occurs on the slack side, where the fabric is bunched up.
:iconfuyu-oleander:
fuyu-oleander Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you for making this! It's just what I was hoping to find.
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